I’ve known the artist Tomas Vu for nearly 20 years—I first heard of him through our

I’ve known the artist Tomas Vu for nearly 20 years—I first heard of him through our mutual and artist friends the late Gandalf Gaván and his partner Nicola López in 1998, then in 2000 we were introduced by the painter Gregory Amenoff (Chair of Visual Arts at Columbia University), Vu’s teaching colleague, at Amenoff’s opening reception of his solo exhibit at now defunct gallery Salander–O’Reilly. My knowledge of Vu’s work, however, truly begun with his solo exhibit Black Ice at Von Lintel Gallery in 2006, which led to an enduring friendship ever since. We’ve been through many struggles, up and down and sideways; and endless stories, short and long, his and mine, had been mutually exchanged and meditated on for the well-being of our sanity. (We both were born in Vietnam and have survived the war in our formative years; we, like other immigrants, in our maturity fought hard to find our calling as artists in a new and adopted culture.) On the occasion of Vu’s new solo exhibit Space Oddity 69/19/45, and while he’s in the midst of working on a large site-specific installation, we both managed on a quiet Sunday morning to have a long Skype conversation about his life and work. The foll...

Asus ROG Zephyrus M GU502 review: Powerful gaming laptop that scores brownie points in productivity

Asus may have just released its Zephyrus M GU502 gaming laptop, but we’ve been testing this device for a while now to see if it lives up to the Zephyrus standards. The Zephyrus M that Asus sent us packed a 9th Gen Intel Core i7 CPU, Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660Ti GPU, 16GB of DDR4 RAM (Expandable to 32GB) and an M.2 NVMe PCIe 3.0 512GB SSD. The build quality on this device is pretty solid sporting a brushed aluminium lid with a red Zephyrus logo on the side. Asus has used a combination of magnesium and aluminium alloys on the chassis, ensuring a light form factor. The palm rest hides honeycomb reinforcements to ensure zero flex and a stiff frame. Asus confirmed that the GU502 is 14 percent smaller in volume and 22 percent lighter than the previous Zephyrus M. The Zephyrus M series ditches the famed Zephyrus design that shifts the keyboard to the bottom and trackpad to the side, opting for a more traditional user layout, and is far more comfortable than the Zephyrus GX501. The keyboard doesn’t get a Numpad but it is particularly nice for typing and gaming; there’s a little tactile feel when pressing down on a key and the spacing between each key is quite adequate. T...