Inside an NCI Building Systems plant in north Houston, a machine unspools long sheets of steel to be chopped, crunched through more than a dozen metal rollers and bent into corrugated building panels. Rolls of metal sheet 1 to 4 feet wide line the floor in all shades of gray, beige, green and red. The building panels and pieces they become are loaded onto trucks and shipped to construction sites to outfit new warehouses, grocery stores, stadiums and schools. The plant, part of NCI subsidiary MBCI, houses the operations of three NCI plants that were open in Texas before the last recession pushed the company to consolidate, said plant manager Carl Hoffart, who oversees about 127 employees who keep the assembly lines moving 24 hours a day, cutting and bending more than 50,000 feet of steel daily. As the construction industry has transformed in the last decade, consolidating has been just one of the difficult tasks undertaken at NCI. Between 2007 and 2010, its market in low-rise, non-residential buildings plummeted by 60 percent, and construction is only now recovering to levels previously considered historic lows. Now, as other economic indicators show the economy is generally rebo...