Nearly a year ago, the Food and Drug Administration issued a major statement on “electronic nicotine delivery systems” (ENDS) — better known as e-cigarettes — accompanied by a speech from former Commissioner Scott Gottlieb declaring that there was an urgent need to address an “epidemic” of teenage use of flavored, cartridge-based products. After a summit with the five leading e-cigarette sellers, Juul, Altria, Reynolds, JTI/Logic and Fontem/Blu), each of the companies issued statements announcing steps to address the FDA’s concerns. Most notably, Juul and Altria promised to end sales of all “flavored” pods, and only sell products that mirror “currently available for combustible cigarettes and tobacco and menthol-based products,” including tobacco, menthol and mint-flavored pods. Juul, which recently made a $12.8 billion deal with tobacco giant Altria, was widely seen to have been a major beneficiary of the FDA’s decision not to ban the mint-flavored version, which has never been part of the traditional tobacco control lexicon, nor has it ever been considered a “traditional” smoking flavor. Juul CEO Kevin Burns has spoken out against the sale of e-cigarette flavors that “mimic ca...