Mumbai is a cacophony of honking horns loud enough to damage hearing. Last year, police installed a decibel meter at a busy intersection: Only when honking died down would traffic lights turn green. OK, now a word of caution for those of you listening to this next story in your car – you are about to hear the honking horns that serve as the soundtrack to India’s financial capital, Mumbai. The city of more than 20 million people is notorious for its traffic and noise. Police have a creative plan to change that, as NPR’s Lauren Frayer reports from her Mumbai neighborhood. LAUREN FRAYER, BYLINE: So I’m trying to cross the street here in Mumbai. It’s this kind of tangle of rickshaws and buses. And the traffic light – oh, it’s not working here, actually. This is actually a police officer trying to direct traffic. He’s waving his hands, but nobody’s paying attention to him. FRAYER: I hop into a rickshaw, and the driver, Mohamed Sarfaraz, explains how horns are like a language in Mumbai. FRAYER: “A short beep means, hey, I’m about an inch off your back bumper,” he says. “A long beep means, heads-up, I’m...